PowerSwitch Main Page
PowerSwitch
The UK's Peak Oil Discussion Forum & Community
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Ghawar fading faster than anyone expected
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PowerSwitch Forum Index -> News
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
kenneal - lagger
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 11529
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2019 2:05 pm    Post subject: Ghawar fading faster than anyone expected Reply with quote

Ghawar fading faster than anyone expected according to this article.
_________________
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
adam2
Site Admin


Joined: 02 Jul 2007
Posts: 7572
Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2019 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It looks as though "twilight in the dessert" may have been a little premature, but that depletion is now starting to become significant.

And of course we should remember that these recently published figures are themselves almost certainly optimistic. They are issued as part of a bond prospectus to encourage inward investment into the Saudi oil industry.
_________________
"Installers and owners of emergency diesels must assume that they will have to run for a week or more"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
fuzzy



Joined: 29 Nov 2013
Posts: 1044
Location: The Marches, UK

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2019 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reprinted from the late lamented oildrum:

http://www.321energy.com/editorials/staniford/staniford051807.html

I have noticed this month that if I search for something exactly, that I know existed, on a search engine, that every extra character in a string brings up gibberish until I have typed the exact full details. Like some sort of hashing program to avoid hits.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kenneal - lagger
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 11529
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2019 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll read that tonight before I go to sleep, fuzzy.


Like heck!!!
_________________
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
BritDownUnder



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Posts: 619
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2019 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some people say that Ghawar was ruined by too much water injection and some of the oil that would have been 'extractable' at a slower extraction rate now cannot be.

Meanwhile, the Saudis are realising that you cannot eat oil and their rapidly expanding, Wahhabi indoctrinated population need something to eat as well as praying five times daily.

Quote:
SALIC is an investment arm in the Kingdom of Saudi Public Investment Fund.

"They're a sovereign fund and invest for food security and livestock production all over the world," Mr Thomas said.


A great radio interview from the farmer who is set to make $60m out of this deal. He seemed really down to earth but said that his children were not ambitious enough to run the farms and were happy to get the $60m in cash instead.
_________________
G'Day cobber!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kenneal - lagger
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 11529
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2019 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

With global warming in mind, I wouldn't have thought that Australia would be the best investment for food growing. I know that they have been suffering drought conditions frequently in the central/eastern part of the country but how is the west doing BDU?
_________________
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 5573
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2019 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fuzzy wrote:
Reprinted from the late lamented oildrum:

http://www.321energy.com/editorials/staniford/staniford051807.html

I have noticed this month that if I search for something exactly, that I know existed, on a search engine, that every extra character in a string brings up gibberish until I have typed the exact full details. Like some sort of hashing program to avoid hits.

That is an intriguing observation. Have you observed it on more then the google search engine?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
fuzzy



Joined: 29 Nov 2013
Posts: 1044
Location: The Marches, UK

PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2019 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would only use ggle at work [standard PC desktop], it's usually duckduckgo at home. The thing is I only search for obscure, unpopular with MSM things. Usually because the old links, which I always bookmark, have died.

If I typed 'Kim and Justin' it wouldn't happen. I think they do try to push their anti-agenda down the hits and bury stuff in spam. I suspect copyright owners now have more powers to remove original stuff which shouldn't be public for free.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BritDownUnder



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Posts: 619
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
With global warming in mind, I wouldn't have thought that Australia would be the best investment for food growing. I know that they have been suffering drought conditions frequently in the central/eastern part of the country but how is the west doing BDU?

Hello Ken. I am not sure about the West of Australia but there is a lot of arable land over here and there is probably some that is not in drought at any one time.
While these comments are not directly related to the Ghawar oil field it is probable that the Saudis are investing to provide a return when their oil production does decline. One can only presume that the future for Australia even with global warming is probably better than the future for Saudi Arabia in the minds of these investors. I read that many Arab countries are also investing in farming land in Sudan. The problem over in Sudan, according to that article, is that the people who actually own the land are not being told that it is being sold to someone else. I see trouble ahead.
_________________
G'Day cobber!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
raspberry-blower



Joined: 14 Mar 2009
Posts: 1841

PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BritDownUnder wrote:
kenneal - lagger wrote:
With global warming in mind, I wouldn't have thought that Australia would be the best investment for food growing. I know that they have been suffering drought conditions frequently in the central/eastern part of the country but how is the west doing BDU?

Hello Ken. I am not sure about the West of Australia but there is a lot of arable land over here and there is probably some that is not in drought at any one time.
While these comments are not directly related to the Ghawar oil field it is probable that the Saudis are investing to provide a return when their oil production does decline. One can only presume that the future for Australia even with global warming is probably better than the future for Saudi Arabia in the minds of these investors. I read that many Arab countries are also investing in farming land in Sudan. The problem over in Sudan, according to that article, is that the people who actually own the land are not being told that it is being sold to someone else. I see trouble ahead.

There have been reports of rioting in Sudan against the incumbent Government. Related per chance?
_________________
A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools - Douglas Adams.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kenneal - lagger
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 11529
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2019 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

raspberry-blower wrote:
................There have been reports of rioting in Sudan against the incumbent Government. Related per chance?


Looks like the answer is "Yes."

Quote:
The effort may yet pay off, but early signs augur ill. Many Sudanese describe the plan as little more than a naked land grab that’s depriving them of their ancestral fields while enriching the government and a foreign corporate elite. The anger has spread from villages to cities, becoming part of a larger uprising—the so-called Revolution of the Hungry—that constitutes the gravest threat to Bashir since he seized power. Protests triggered in part by soaring bread prices have taken place in more than 30 cities and towns since mid-December, and at least 50 people have been killed. The unrest shows no signs of abating. As one farmer from Gezira state, not far south of Khartoum, told me, “We’ll protest until we’re dead or we get our way.”


Quote:
But few villages are giving in, and with climate change also shrinking their grazing land, anger at the government and its corporate partners has spilled over into—and in a number of instances fueled—the recent countrywide unrest. Dozens of locals burned down the Nile pump station at Zayed Al Khair, in 2016. That was the first of many demonstrations during which participants honed slogans such as “Freedom, peace, and justice! Revolution is the choice of the people!”—it rhymes in Arabic—that are being chanted across the country.

_________________
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
BritDownUnder



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Posts: 619
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2019 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an aside to the oil field I looked up the available arable land in the world and Australia comes top in the available land per capita. Sudan is nowhere near the top - they just have a corrupt government. One country to watch is Ukraine which has a very high available amount of arable land per capita. Ever wondered why the Ukraine is being so hotly contested for a country with no oil? Maybe you have just found the answer.

Personally I am surprised why the Saudis have left it so late in investing their money until it appears that their oilfields are showing signs of declining and electrical transportation is becoming feasible (for land transportation anyway). They should have started in the 1970s but they chose to invest in other things and misallocate their money.

There may come a time when agricultural land is more valuable than an oilfield.

Boring statistics. Australia has about 400,000 sq km of arable land and about 3,000,000 sq km of pasture land. The total UK land area is about 240,000 sq km not all of it useable agricultural land. Believe it or not Australia also has about 10 times as much 'renewable' water resources per capita as the UK. However I suspect the Australian water resources are nowhere near the useful land and that is probably why the country has a lot of droughts.
_________________
G'Day cobber!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mikepepler
Site Admin


Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 3017
Location: Rye, UK

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It strikes me that one of the most significant points may not be the lost production, but that it is *cheap* high-EROEI production that has been lost.
_________________
Mike

"Deal with reality or reality will deal with you"
Dr Colin Campbell

http://peplers.blogspot.com
http://peakoilupdate.blogspot.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
kenneal - lagger
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 11529
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BDU, the amount of water available per hectare has a huge effect on the productivity of the land. In the UK we can graze 1.5 cattle or 10 sheep per hectare year round with a lot more on summer only grazing but I doubt that is possible on most Australian grazing.
_________________
Action is the antidote to despair - Joan Baez
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 5573
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2019 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Consider to be arable does not mean you have sufficient water to irrigate it. Much of Sudan is the Sahara desert and without the irrigation water from the Nile and it's tributary would be totally useless. As it is they import about 630 million dollars worth of wheat each year from Russia. They pay a lot of their bills with gold mined in country but still are spending four dollars for every three produced. There real problem is too many people compared to the production capacity of the land , economy and the water supply.
The water supply issue also applies to vast stretches of the Australian out back.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PowerSwitch Forum Index -> News All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 1 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group