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Latest eco barn conversion pics
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Vortex2



Joined: 13 Jan 2019
Posts: 175

PostPosted: Fri Feb 01, 2019 11:10 pm    Post subject: Latest eco barn conversion pics Reply with quote

The lefthand picture shows the kitchen window, front door, bedroom window and the North facing wall.

The righthand picture shows the East facing glazed wall, of the main open plan room, which looks down over our land.

The other two walls are unglazed.

The blue girders are part of the tin barn.

The house sits within the tin barn, hardly touching.

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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
Posts: 14525
Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What’s the rationale behind not glazing the south and west sides?
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Vortex2



Joined: 13 Jan 2019
Posts: 175

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:

What’s the rationale behind not glazing the south and west sides?


There is a huge barn and wood yard a couple of metres behind the house - those two walls are massively sound proofed to block chain saw noise.

We also have to build an acoustic wall on our boundary.

The South view would have just shown the other barn wall,

The West view would have been OK .. but we will in fact just 'see' the acoustic wall. Also the Planners said that they wanted that wall untouched so that the house still looked like a barn from the road.
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
Posts: 14525
Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK, I see, not a lot you can do.

A friend commented once on a nearby house, she said it looked "all out of proportion" because the north side, which is the side she could see from the road, had very few and very small windows.

I pointed out that the south side (not visible from the road) had generous window area, allowing maximum heat and light. It was designed and built by the owner who wanted minimum heating bills.
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 11072
Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've had planners complaining in the recent past about a house not facing the "right" way because it faced south and not to the road and that there are no windows on the north elevation. When you explain the benefits of solar orientation they look at you blankly! They obviously haven't heard of global warming or peak oil or haven't got the intelligence to connect them with anything that they do in their daily lives.

The officer who complained about the house not facing the road did so despite the fact that the old, burnt down thatched house that was being replaced didn't face the road and had all its windows facing south! I got rather cross and was told off by my client!! The officer concerned obviously had done any CPD recently.
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Vortex2



Joined: 13 Jan 2019
Posts: 175

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BTW all this acoustic shielding is nonsense ... our neighbour only works a couple of hours a week and away from our house ... until we applied for the house.

He then raised a big stink and worked 24/7 cutting wood on our fence line during the sound test week that the council required.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 5214
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I do house and property appraisals for my town. We call it listing here as we are maintaining the towns "grand list" for tax purposes. It is half science half art at best. There is "Curb appeal" being what it looks like from the road where you can first view it, and there is functional utility which can include passive solar design, practical room layouts, insulation levels, etc. A house that has both curb appeal and functional utility is worth more then one that misses on one of the counts.
That the local regulators let neighbors needlessly interfere in your planning process diminishes the value of every property in their jurisdiction. Something they can't see or ever admit to.
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Vortex2



Joined: 13 Jan 2019
Posts: 175

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The kerb appeal etc don't really matter in our case.

In the UK you generally cannot build on farmland.

The planning system is totally broken. You need to be a politician or have familiy who work in local government to obtain planning permission without years of grief.

So our barn conversion has increased the value of the site by quite a large amount - even after the cost of the conversion has been deducted.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2019 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vortex2 wrote:
The kerb appeal etc don't really matter in our case.

In the UK you generally cannot build on farmland.

The planning system is totally broken. You need to be a politician or have familiy who work in local government to obtain planning permission without years of grief.

So our barn conversion has increased the value of the site by quite a large amount - even after the cost of the conversion has been deducted.
No you don't get to deduct the cost of the conversion. The value of the property should be what you paid for it plus every "£" you have spent on the renovations plus a bit of profit for your sweat equity. If not you have executed a losing project.
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Vortex2



Joined: 13 Jan 2019
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the UK the value of the land per acre goes up if a house has been built on it.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 5214
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vortex2 wrote:
In the UK the value of the land per acre goes up if a house has been built on it.
Same here as soon as you subdivide it and apply for the water and sewer permits they go from $1,500/ A to $40,000 for a building lot up to two acres. Average prices as a starting point, then we adjust up or down based on location,view etc.
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clv101
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Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2019 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vortex2 wrote:
The planning system is totally broken. You need to be a politician or have familiy who work in local government to obtain planning permission without years of grief.

Ain't that the truth! I paid very close attention to the planning system in our area for a couple of years when we were sorting out our place and it was incredible how many out-of-policy applications were waved through (often against planning officer advice) or enforcements dropped - very much a case who you are.

Vortex2 wrote:
In the UK the value of the land per acre goes up if a house has been built on it.

Regular agricultural land in England and Wales (excluding high elevation or very small parcels) sells for around £5-10,000 per acre. However, a 1/5 acre plot with planning permission for a single dwelling (excluding town/city centres) would typically be around £100,000, so half a million per acre. That's a 50-100 fold increase in land value, at a stroke of a pen. Ripe for corruption.
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
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Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 2:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vtsnowedin wrote:
I do house and property appraisals for my town. We call it listing here as we are maintaining the towns "grand list" for tax purposes. It is half science half art at best. There is "Curb appeal" being what it looks like from the road where you can first view it, and there is functional utility which can include passive solar design, practical room layouts, insulation levels, etc. A house that has both curb appeal and functional utility is worth more then one that misses on one of the counts.
That the local regulators let neighbors needlessly interfere in your planning process diminishes the value of every property in their jurisdiction. Something they can't see or ever admit to.


In the UK houses are rated for "Council Tax" on the ground area and number of storeys. How well built or the accommodation offered or the amount of insulation/renewables fitted has no bearing.

Anyone has a right to object to a planning application in the UK but how much notice is taken will depend on whether the objection is on valid planning grounds and how close to the application the objector lives. The next door neighbour will have more "pull" than someone who lives in the next parish (virtually no pull unless it's something like a wind farm). An objection of not liking the look of the extension/new house will not be taken notice of whereas an objection that the bedroom window of the new house looks directly into the objectors bedroom/living room will be taken very seriously.

Building a new house on farmland is very difficult to achieve as farmland is very carefully protected in the UK. Such a house has to be of high architectural merit, i.e. big and expensive for a rich person, or have a demonstrable agricultural need, i.e. for a stock person, before permission will be granted and in the case of agricultural need will have a tie on it such that it can't be sold on the open market easily. So you either have to be rich enough to buy a large plot and employ a known architect or you have to be able to demonstrate a viable level of farming.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:

In the UK houses are rated for "Council Tax" on the ground area and number of storeys. How well built or the accommodation offered or the amount of insulation/renewables fitted has no bearing.


By law our stated goal here is to determine what a property would actually sell for on the open market so quality and energy have as much bearing as they do to prospective buyers. We are constantly having our work compared to recent sales which can be a less then satisfactory measure as some buyers have more money then brains. Our work has progressed to the point that frequently property owners when choosing to sell often list there property for the figure we have assigned to it and they promptly sell for that figure.
Subdivision and development of farmland is discouraged and enrolled farmland that has been taxed at it's "use rate" has a lean on it that has to be paid back if it is developed. Forest land lots over 25 acres also have this tax avoidance program with the same penalties for development.
Actually there is very little prime farmland in my area as it tends to be in thin strips along the valley bottoms less then one farm wide into which the river and the state highway take up a big chunk. Dairy farming is declining rapidly state wide losing ten percent of the dairy farms in one year and down to a total of just 700 remaining and those 700 are still over producing for the declining market demand.
A trust fund baby just bought a nearby farm and is having 25 acres of it's woodland clear cut to turn it into organic pasture for grass fed beef. The pile of tree length logs waiting for the chipper is about 300 feet long and 25 feet high.
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clv101
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Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2019 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
In the UK houses are rated for "Council Tax" on the ground area and number of storeys. How well built or the accommodation offered or the amount of insulation/renewables fitted has no bearing.
No, it's purely based on rateable value (it's open market value April 1991 in England and April 2003 in Wales). Area and number of storeys will impact that value - but so to will build quality, insulation, location... everything.

kenneal - lagger wrote:
Building a new house on farmland is very difficult to achieve as farmland is very carefully protected in the UK.
Except the the 'greenbelt' in England, the UK planning system doesn't have mechanisms to carefully protect farmland. It does have mechanisms to ensure development is 'sustainable' though which residential developments in the 'open countryside' typically aren't described as. Meaning new development is limited to existing settlements/service centres.

kenneal - lagger wrote:
Such a house has to be of high architectural merit, i.e. big and expensive for a rich person, or have a demonstrable agricultural need, i.e. for a stock person, before permission will be granted and in the case of agricultural need will have a tie on it such that it can't be sold on the open market easily. So you either have to be rich enough to buy a large plot and employ a known architect or you have to be able to demonstrate a viable level of farming.
Or in Scotland new developments in the open countryside are facilitated by the crofting legislation and in Wales facilitated by the Rural Enterprise Dwelling (not the same (much broader) as a agricultural tie) policy and the One Planet Development framework.
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