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KFCs closed First sign of apocalypse?
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 4803
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fuzzy wrote:
Strongarm is not bad for North East beer. I grew up near Newcastle and the beer of my youth was truly dreadful [Scottish and Newcastle] with very little choice. Now I am on the Welsh border we are surrounded by amazing beer and cider makers. Just a shame it's 30 miles to buy any big ticket items. I have just come in from a walk and my legs are like jellly:

http://www.streetmap.co.uk/idld.srf?x=338420&y=283340&z=115&sv=338420,283340&st=4&mapp=idld.srf&searchp=s.srf&dn=806&ax=343500&ay=282500&lm=0

Nice map. I assume Quarries (dis) means abandoned. What were they quarrying?
.
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
Posts: 12605
Location: York

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Little John wrote:
Cameron's bitter, north of Whitby


I bet he is Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And everywhere else he goes?
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Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
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Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hahahahahahaha
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Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
Posts: 6125
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vtsnowedin wrote:
fuzzy wrote:
Strongarm is not bad for North East beer. I grew up near Newcastle and the beer of my youth was truly dreadful [Scottish and Newcastle] with very little choice. Now I am on the Welsh border we are surrounded by amazing beer and cider makers. Just a shame it's 30 miles to buy any big ticket items. I have just come in from a walk and my legs are like jellly:

http://www.streetmap.co.uk/idld.srf?x=338420&y=283340&z=115&sv=338420,283340&st=4&mapp=idld.srf&searchp=s.srf&dn=806&ax=343500&ay=282500&lm=0

Nice map. I assume Quarries (dis) means abandoned. What were they quarrying?
.
North East....all sorts

Round my way, it was tin mines, iron mines and coal mines. Lots of sandstone quarries in the more distant past. There's still a salt mine just 4 miles up the road from me and another one due to open around 11 miles from me in a couple of years.

One interesting little local phenomenon is the village next door to me called Skinningrove. They had an iron mine at the top of the village. The Iron mine has long since closed down. But, iron oxide kept leaching out of the old mine meaning Skinningrove became famous for its "red" river". Apparently, it didn't hurt the wildlife. But, it definitely looked a bit weird. I've noticed, over the last few decades, the redness appears to have largely gone away.


Last edited by Little John on Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 4803
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Little John wrote:
vtsnowedin wrote:
fuzzy wrote:
Strongarm is not bad for North East beer. I grew up near Newcastle and the beer of my youth was truly dreadful [Scottish and Newcastle] with very little choice. Now I am on the Welsh border we are surrounded by amazing beer and cider makers. Just a shame it's 30 miles to buy any big ticket items. I have just come in from a walk and my legs are like jellly:

http://www.streetmap.co.uk/idld.srf?x=338420&y=283340&z=115&sv=338420,283340&st=4&mapp=idld.srf&searchp=s.srf&dn=806&ax=343500&ay=282500&lm=0

Nice map. I assume Quarries (dis) means abandoned. What were they quarrying?
.
North East....all sorts

Round my way, it was tin mines, iron mines and coal mines. Lots of sandstone quarries in the more distant past. There are still a salt mines just 4 miles up the road from me and another one due to open around 11 miles form me in a couple of years.

Interesting, I never heard of salt mines in the UK before. Coal tin and iron are the stuff of history but salt and the UK never came on the same page in anything I have read. Good commercial quality and quantity product?
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Little John



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a specialised form of salt called potash. Typically used on roads in winter.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Little John wrote:
It's a specialised form of salt called potash. Typically used on roads in winter.

Potash is a salt containing potassium which is a fertilizer. Road salt is usually calcium chloride which can be mined or evaporated out of sea water.
It maybe another case of a people divided by a common language.
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johnhemming2



Joined: 30 Jun 2015
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are Sodium Chloride (salt) mines in the UK. I am not aware of the UK using Potassium based salts on the roads.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-35322992
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Little John



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah..Well maybe I have that wrong
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johnhemming2



Joined: 30 Jun 2015
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Its one of those things about language. Salt as a chemical definition is something made of an acid and a base. One of those is Sodium Chloride, but when people refer to Salt they normally mean NaCl.
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fuzzy



Joined: 29 Nov 2013
Posts: 777
Location: The Marches, UK

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the potash was the basis of the chemical industry on the river Tees.
Over in shropshire, it could be slate, or some sort of heated old very hard sedimentary rock, or volcanic eg Dhustone:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titterstone_Clee_Hill

We do have very old volcano plugs that were undersea, from the Malvern hills to the Wrekin at Telford.

Our area has very strange geology with some of it Cambrian or even earlier. We were on the very edge of the ice sheets at the last ice age, so lots of meltwater lakes burst, carving very steep valleys, some on top of ridges or hills. I am told we started near the South pole and drifted North, bumping into Canada, Scotland and other places.
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Potemkin Villager



Joined: 14 Mar 2006
Posts: 1036
Location: Narnia

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fuzzy wrote:
I think the potash was the basis of the chemical industry on the river Tees.
Over in shropshire, it could be slate, or some sort of heated old very hard sedimentary rock, or volcanic eg Dhustone:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titterstone_Clee_Hill

We do have very old volcano plugs that were undersea, from the Malvern hills to the Wrekin at Telford.

Our area has very strange geology with some of it Cambrian or even earlier. We were on the very edge of the ice sheets at the last ice age, so lots of meltwater lakes burst, carving very steep valleys, some on top of ridges or hills. I am told we started near the South pole and drifted North, bumping into Canada, Scotland and other places.


"The summit of Titterstone Clee is bleak, treeless and shaped by decades of quarrying. Many of the industrial structures still remain, and contribute to the intimidating and mysterious atmosphere of the hill top, especially during the prolonged winter fogs that descend over these hills."

Sounds a perfect location for shooting some post collapse dystopian drama...... a few pints of Strongarm might take the edge off.
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
Posts: 12605
Location: York

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are salt mines in Cheshire, the part that used to be under the sea (hence the salt). You can tell where they are by walking around and spotting seaside plants (who like salty soil) growing in unlikely-looking places (like 50 miles inland, or 300' up).

Asparagus is quite salt-tolerant.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 12:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just a bit of research has shown me that the UK is actually number ten in the world potash production, ahead of the USA. Canada is the world leader followed by Russia. As the growing world population requires more food the demand for potash will increase so your UK mines have a excellent future in front of them in spite of the current over supply and low prices.
A chance to buy low if there ever was one.
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