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Internal wall insulation using cork
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mikepepler
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Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 2906
Location: Rye, UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 02, 2017 7:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thermal imaging is quite expensive, but a cheap alternative is an infrared temperature probe, which you can pick up for 20 or less. It means you can only test one spot at a time, but if you have a rough idea where to start it can still be useful. I made a little video the first time I tried one out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UGINQpY2kU
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
Posts: 14263
Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Thu Mar 02, 2017 11:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mikepepler wrote:
Thermal imaging is quite expensive, but a cheap alternative is an infrared temperature probe, which you can pick up for 20 or less. It means you can only test one spot at a time, but if you have a rough idea where to start it can still be useful. I made a little video the first time I tried one out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UGINQpY2kU


Impressive.
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Catweazle



Joined: 17 Feb 2008
Posts: 2205
Location: Little England, over the hills

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 1:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If using expanding polyurethane to fill gaps I highly recommend getting a Teflon coated gun that screws on top of "gun grade" PU. Makes the job much more controllable.

For flat roofing, GRP is excellent - it lasts for years and years and can be easily applied around odd shapes like vents and chimney flues.
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fuzzy



Joined: 29 Nov 2013
Posts: 777
Location: The Marches, UK

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Does expanded foam have much of a lifespan? I know it has odd causes of failure, but I don't know what kills it. It doesn't last in fridges for example - perhaps deliberately.
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Lurkalot



Joined: 08 Mar 2014
Posts: 207

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It certainly has a lifespan in the cans in that it just won't come out after a few years in my experience . I do seem to recall reading somewhere that it loses it's insulating properties over time too , or rather it diminishes to a point where it is on parity with regular polystyrene, something to do with the gases contained in the original application gradually leaching out and being replaced with normal air. I'm not too sure about the physical degradation , if kept dry it should last . I've seen foam insulation left outside that has deteriorated to a small degree but can't really give a definite answer.
The topic does remind me of the first time I used expanding foam. Myself and another guy were asked to use it to fill holes in a roof space. Neither of us had used it before and our application was , well , fairly liberal. Came back the following day to see several "mushrooms "growing out of the roof.
With regards to roof covering a lot of the jobs I've worked on have been metal , lead predominantly, some zinc , some copper and stainless steel seems to be becoming more common.
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Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
Posts: 6125
Location: UK

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the end, nothing lasts for ever. So, the question I always ask myself, when I am about to use some material or process to solve a construction problem, is if/when am I going to need to dig back into the area and replace/repair/maintain what I have done, how much will it cost and how available will be a like-for-like replacement of the materials used.

When you do that, old fashioned and/or low-tech methods often don't look so "inefficient". If you have to get someone in to implement them, they are often very expensive. But that is mostly down to labour costs. However, if you implement them with your own labour, the cost issue can be largely eliminated


Last edited by Little John on Sat Mar 04, 2017 10:52 am; edited 1 time in total
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Lurkalot



Joined: 08 Mar 2014
Posts: 207

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Funny you should say about nothing lasting forever. For much of my life a large portion of work has been in restoration for the NT , EH and redundant church commission . We routinely used stainless fixings from the early '80's and there have been times when we have had to replace rotten timbers and have been able to reuse those fixings. It always seemed odd that we would use stainless screws that would have a very long lifespan but the timber into which they went had a much shorter lifespan . Early on we were treating timber but that has all but disappeared on most jobs , indeeed on the Bodlien library rather than treat for woodworm spiders were introduced to pray upon the beetles.
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BritDownUnder



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Posts: 421
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia

PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

vtsnowedin wrote:
How available are thermal imaging cameras? They used to be a specialty here but I wouldn't be surprised to find it is just an app for your smart phone now. A few pictures of the outside of your house on a cold morning while the heat is working will show you where the largest leaks are.


I got one online for US$500 plus postage to Australia. Very pleased with it and I could offset against tax as I used it on occasions for electrical work inspections on business.

I can see a tide mark in my wall injected foam insulation about a foot from the ceiling, places where insulation is missing and the like. Also good for telling you which windows are bad and where thermal bridges exist. What you can do about such problems is a bit more complicated than just identifying them however.
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Catweazle



Joined: 17 Feb 2008
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Location: Little England, over the hills

PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PU foam degrades very quickly in UV / Sunlight, also, GRP is actually slightly vapour permeable, but easily painted / sealed.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 4802
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Sat Mar 04, 2017 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BritDownUnder wrote:
vtsnowedin wrote:
How available are thermal imaging cameras? They used to be a specialty here but I wouldn't be surprised to find it is just an app for your smart phone now. A few pictures of the outside of your house on a cold morning while the heat is working will show you where the largest leaks are.


I got one online for US$500 plus postage to Australia. Very pleased with it and I could offset against tax as I used it on occasions for electrical work inspections on business.

I can see a tide mark in my wall injected foam insulation about a foot from the ceiling, places where insulation is missing and the like. Also good for telling you which windows are bad and where thermal bridges exist. What you can do about such problems is a bit more complicated than just identifying them however.
Yes but knowing where the problem exists or dose not exist is a very good start. It sounds like you have made a very good investment. It is minus 16C here this morning with the wind blowing 13 k/hr. I'm going to putter around inside after putting an extra piece of maple on the fire. Cool
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