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Best wishes for the future

 
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fuzzy



Joined: 29 Nov 2013
Posts: 1316
Location: The Marches, UK

PostPosted: Wed Dec 25, 2019 10:41 pm    Post subject: Best wishes for the future Reply with quote

I hope your preps turn out worthwhile next year, or the world becomes less risky [no I don't expect that].

I will try to start some useful prep idea threads soon, but I have been busy juggling life for several years. Next year might be more of my own control.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 6307
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Wed Dec 25, 2019 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Best wishes to you as well.
Preparations are always a problem decision due to the uncertainty of the actual problems you will face in the future and how far out in the future those problems will be at your door.
Being self reliant and able to withstand a cutoff of any regular service you normally use is as about as good as it gets considering the uncertainty of what might get shut off and when.
A cutoff of the electric grid, public water from mains, sewage disposal, fuel to heat your living space and fuel to heat that space and cook your food are all possible things that might go toes up in an emergency that might be caused by as little as a storm or flood or something more severe like war.
Presuming it won't happen to you is a poor plan. Assuming it will be apocalyptic next year is also a poor plan. Some prudent reserves from food to cash and fuel that don't break the budget but are there if need be are perhaps the best preparations.
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
Posts: 7950
Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Thu Dec 26, 2019 2:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Agree, 2020 MIGHT be apocalyptic, but probably wont be.
It is prudent to be well prepared for reasonably foreseeable emergencies, and at least somewhat prepared for the more improbable events.

Extreme weather, utility breakdowns, localised terrorist attacks, industrial disputes, and localised rioting/disorder are entirely foreseeable events that have occurred in the past.

BY being properly prepared for these entirely foreseeable events, you will be at least partially prepared for more extreme and less likely events.
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PS_RalphW



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 5770
Location: Cambridge

PostPosted: Thu Dec 26, 2019 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My views on prepping have changed somewhat over the years. I used to be very focused on reducing my dependence on grid electricity and fossil fuels but my efforts were limited my ignorance of the bigger picture, and being constrained by societal norms, not least in respect of bringing up my adopted children. Now my children are full blooded teenagers with significant mental health issues due to their early trauma, I have gained a much thicker skin to face down criticism from the ignorant, and I view my life on a finite time frame having survived cancer. I know my children will never have the skills to survive societal collapse, I fear they will struggle to survive even in the society we have today, as they have the unglamorous kind of issues that too often lead to homelessness, incarceration, addiction, rape and an early grave. I know from direct experience that if they inherit the wealth I have accidentally accumulated they will be relieved of it by the unscrupulous within a year, as happened to a friend's sister some years ago.

My wife and I are aging, and neither of us are likely to live as long as our parents did. It is hard to see our children becoming our carers when they are so far from caring for themselves. I have little confidence in financial institutions surviving long enough to put money into trusts, and we do not know younger people than us we could trust to manage our money for the children. Our kind of family usually end up socially isolated because people see behaviour not trauma.
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Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
Posts: 8170
Location: UK

PostPosted: Thu Dec 26, 2019 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PS_RalphW wrote:
My views on prepping have changed somewhat over the years. I used to be very focused on reducing my dependence on grid electricity and fossil fuels but my efforts were limited my ignorance of the bigger picture, and being constrained by societal norms, not least in respect of bringing up my adopted children. Now my children are full blooded teenagers with significant mental health issues due to their early trauma, I have gained a much thicker skin to face down criticism from the ignorant, and I view my life on a finite time frame having survived cancer. I know my children will never have the skills to survive societal collapse, I fear they will struggle to survive even in the society we have today, as they have the unglamorous kind of issues that too often lead to homelessness, incarceration, addiction, rape and an early grave. I know from direct experience that if they inherit the wealth I have accidentally accumulated they will be relieved of it by the unscrupulous within a year, as happened to a friend's sister some years ago.

My wife and I are aging, and neither of us are likely to live as long as our parents did. It is hard to see our children becoming our carers when they are so far from caring for themselves. I have little confidence in financial institutions surviving long enough to put money into trusts, and we do not know younger people than us we could trust to manage our money for the children. Our kind of family usually end up socially isolated because people see behaviour not trauma.
I'm very sorry to hear all of that Ralph. That is a very tough combination of cards you have to play with there.

Do you not have any extended family you could rely on to carry on with managing your kid's affairs after you and your wife are gone?
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PS_RalphW



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 5770
Location: Cambridge

PostPosted: Thu Dec 26, 2019 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I only have 4 surviving relatives I am aware of, and the only one younger than me has mental health problems of his own.

My wife is estranged from her brother's family. Although her family is more extensive, we are not close to any of them younger than us. We come from families that have few children later in life, so family wealth has concentrated over the generations in the few survivors.
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
Posts: 7950
Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Thu Dec 26, 2019 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PS_RalphW wrote:
I only have 4 surviving relatives I am aware of, and the only one younger than me has mental health problems of his own.

My wife is estranged from her brother's family. Although her family is more extensive, we are not close to any of them younger than us. We come from families that have few children later in life, so family wealth has concentrated over the generations in the few survivors.


Have you considered leaving your estate in some form of trust fund, whereby your adopted children would benefit from a monthly income, but be unable to access any capital, or freehold property ?
That would eliminate risk of anyone parting them from any significant capital or freehold interest in property. Any solicitor should be able to assist.
Any such arrangement is of course reliant on BAU continuing.
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PS_RalphW



Joined: 24 Nov 2005
Posts: 5770
Location: Cambridge

PostPosted: Thu Dec 26, 2019 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="adam2"]
PS_RalphW wrote:

Any such arrangement is of course reliant on BAU continuing.


A significant part of the reason my wife is estranged from her brother is the family trust fund. Neither can access a penny without the agreement of the other.

I do not expect BAU to continue longer than me. My experience so far is that trust funds are a lawyer's delight and family nightmare.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 6307
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Fri Dec 27, 2019 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

PS_RalphW wrote:


I do not expect BAU to continue longer than me. My experience so far is that trust funds are a lawyer's delight and family nightmare.

BAU has been around for a long time and will most likely outlast all of us by centuries. At any rate you have no better option then finding the most reputable firm to set up a trust fund for your adopted children to make the funds available as long as possible.
Not a totally safe option I agree but having none better it is the best you can do.
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