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rash decisions/ thermal underwear
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Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
Posts: 6218
Location: UK

PostPosted: Fri Dec 25, 2015 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
Little John wrote:
Notwithstanding the short term effects of polyester in the environment, polyester takes a few decades to break down. Climate change, on the other hand, also has a rather significant impact on the rest of life. One that is measured in millennia, if not longer, not decades.

Therefore, the question of whether to use polyester or use wool/cotton comes down to a comparison of which form of mass manufactured product (and please don't wank on about organic wool/cotton, because this is not going to clothe 7 billion people) contributes more to climate change? Polyester or Wool/cotton? Do you know the answer to that question?


Too many variables to determine I suspect.
And what about laundering ? I suspect that over the life of a garment, that washing it might use fuel comparable to that used in manufacture.
Yes, indeed, I hadn't even thought of that Adam.
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 25, 2015 11:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm presently wearing a woolen sweater rescued from being thrown away by the elderly chap I was looking after 2 summers ago. It's now got trendy patches on the elbows and some laccy in the waist and hem for shape. I love it!

For washing, wool seems to get a lot less smelly than practically anything else and I've heard of folk just hanging it outside for a day or so to freshen it up instead!
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emordnilap



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PostPosted: Sat Dec 26, 2015 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're reasonably clean you can wear certain garments several times before they need washing; a shirt worn for as day which doesn't get sweaty can be hung and aired and worn a couple of days later and again a couple of days after that.

When it comes to smelliness, it's as much about self-awareness as cleanliness. Often it's just the sweatiest bits of the body need a bit of soap and water.

Jeans often improve with minimal washing.

It's fashion that creates the most pollution and waste.
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biffvernon



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PostPosted: Sat Dec 26, 2015 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, wool doesn't need washing often. That's another reason for its eco-friendliness - less washing powder etc. required.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Sat Dec 26, 2015 11:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

emordnilap wrote:


Jeans often improve with minimal washing.

It has always struck me as a waste to wash a new pair of jeans before their first wearing.
Quote:

It's fashion that creates the most pollution and waste.

True enough.
I grew up in perhaps the last of the Saturday night bath regimen. By Friday everybody was pretty ripe by today's standards but you seldom noticed as you were all equal. If you did notice you politely declined to mention anything about it as you might have the tables turned on you any day.
The idea that teenagers need to take three showers a day and need a full set of freshly laundered cloths each morning with perhaps another set before the evening activities would have frosted my parents and overwhelmed their hot water system. [/quote]
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Little John



Joined: 08 Mar 2008
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2015 1:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I only fully bathe/shower once a week. Usually Saturday morning, first thing. Have done all my life.

Change my socks and underwear once a day. Shirts once every two or three days. Trousers once a week, jackets/jumpers, once a month, coat once every two months or so. Again, have done all my life. All washing is done once a week or once a month (depending on item of clothing).
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emordnilap



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2016 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

vtsnowedin wrote:
emordnilap wrote:


Jeans often improve with minimal washing.

It has always struck me as a waste to wash a new pair of jeans before their first wearing.


+1

In fact, they'll go a long time without washing the first time by the user. They're washed prior to buying (several times, sometimes using highly abrasive materials).

One company will lease jeans, asking you not to wash them, so you can put your 'stamp' on them. Laughing
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adam2
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2016 7:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Winter approaches, so time to re visit this thread I thought.

I have previously spoken of the merits of 100% cotton long underwear, far more comfortable IME than polyester or poly/cotton.
All cotton long underwear can only be recommended for cold DRY conditions, including indoors to save on heating.

It is generally accepted that cotton clothing is most unsuitable if one might get wet without access to shelter and a change of clothing.

Unfortunately the great majority of long underwear sold in the UK is of cheapo poly/cotton and often thin. tight, scratchy, and generally unsatisfactory.

This eBay seller offer a good choice off 100% cotton garments

http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/hermko_unterwaesche/m.html?ssPageName=&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2654

They are in Germany, a bit nearer than the USA supplier that I previously recommended.
Delivery is rather expensive on small orders but far more reasonable if buying several garments.

I have purchased and can vouch for the quality. I have no connection with them.
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried wool, cotton, bamboo, and artificial fibres. The wool and bamboo are too thin for my liking. I settled on the ribbed offering from M&S which an acrylic fibre. They are comfortable and let through less wind than all the others.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shouldn't your outer garment be windproof, WB? You're going to be very cold if the wind is getting through to your skin.
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's why I don't wear the wool or bamboo. AFAIK there is no porous fabric that is windproof, that's why we wear layers, - it gets somewhere close.
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vtsnowedin



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 10:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Being realistic. most of us today spend very little time out doors exposed to the weather in the winter. The last time I felt the need to don my Johnson woolen pants and coat was when I joined a search party looking for a boy lost in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, (sadly we did not find him in time).
If you know you can stay dry all day almost any combination of layers and fabrics will do but if you are going to be a long way from shelter in below freezing temperatures and might get wet to the skin then wool clothing might save your life, but that is no substitute for using your brains and staying dry in the first place.
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PS_RalphW



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I cycle to work the year round. ONly becomes a problem when temperatures are sub-zero, which is increasingly rare these years. The main problem is keeping my fingers, and particularly thumbs, warm. They get wind chill and I need gloves thin enough to operate gears and brakes.
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vtsnowedin



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

PS_RalphW wrote:
I cycle to work the year round. ONly becomes a problem when temperatures are sub-zero, which is increasingly rare these years. The main problem is keeping my fingers, and particularly thumbs, warm. They get wind chill and I need gloves thin enough to operate gears and brakes.

I'm surprised the physical exercise of pedaling the bike doesn't keep you warm. Riders of snow machines (gas powered sleds) have heated seats, handle bars and even a pad under their thumbs which work the throttle. You could bleed off power from the headlight generator of your bike or just install some sort of wind shielding muff over the handle bar grips.
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Little John



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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pedalling in the cold does not necessarily keep hands warm because, in cold weather, the body tends to conserve heat-producing capacity for the main organs by minimising what goes to the extremities. Cold hands don't kill. Cold organs do. It's different if one is engaging in a physical activity that involves vigorous use of the hands. This indeed will tend to keep them warm. But cycling, by definition, does not involve much vigorous exercise of the hands. This means, counter-intuitively, one of the best ways to keep one's hands warm when cycling (in addition to wearing gloves), is to make sure one's main torso is well insulated. This, in turn, will inhibit one's body from enacting its safety mechanism of re-directing all heat away from the hands and to the organs.
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