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Timetable set to phase out high-energy light bulbs
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 5353
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2019 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
Meanwhile in America, the government reveres earlier plans to increase the efficiency of lighting.
https://www.npr.org/2019/09/04/757623821/trump-administration-reverses-standards-for-energy-efficient-light-bulbs

A splendid victory for energy waste, and sod the environment.

And whilst the lower mains voltage in the USA SLIGHTLY reduces the savings from use of low energy lamps, the difference is very minor.

Not to worry. If LEDs are indeed cheaper in the long run considering all costs (initial cost, life expectancy, and KWHs used) the public will move to them without a government mandate.
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
Posts: 7362
Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Sat Sep 28, 2019 1:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I disagree. Most consumers in the UK are quite unable to grasp the long term consequences of small hourly costs.
The saving of a penny an hour is regarded as utterly insignificant if indeed it is considered at all.

The average consumer hates buying light bulbs and tends to choose the cheapest available without any consideration of the running costs.

I presume that circumstances are similar in the USA.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 5353
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Wed Oct 02, 2019 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
I disagree. Most consumers in the UK are quite unable to grasp the long term consequences of small hourly costs.
The saving of a penny an hour is regarded as utterly insignificant if indeed it is considered at all.

The average consumer hates buying light bulbs and tends to choose the cheapest available without any consideration of the running costs.

I presume that circumstances are similar in the USA.
While electric bills are a small part of a US family budget (My last months bill was $77.22) heads of household do look for savings when selecting appliances and bulbs. Store displays are pushing LED bulbs and indeed you have to actively shop for an old style wasteful bulb.
As an aside I just ordered three 12 volt 7 watt LED bulbs for use in my off grid "high hide" deer stand. They presently will be fed off a deep cycle marine lead acid battery having 650 cold cranking amps storage.Final plan is to roof mount a solar panel of 100 watts or larger to run both the lights and electric exclusion fences around food plots surrounding the high hide.
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adam2
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 4:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"cold cranking amps" is not a measure of energy storage.
It is an indication of how many amps the battery can supply for a very short and specified time, at a low and specified temperature, and without the voltage dropping too low.
It is a useful guide as to the engine starting capabilities of a battery, esp. in low temperatures when starting is problematic.

To determine the energy storage capacity of a battery, you need to know the capacity in AH or ampere hours.
A small and lightweight 12 volt car battery will have a capacity as low as 30 AH, a larger and heavy duty car battery up to about 45 H.
Deep cycle batteries range from about 60 AH up to about 200 AH in 12 volt batteries.
60 AH is somewhat portable. 200AH is about the sensible limit for manual handling.

A 60 AH battery will supply 3 amps for 20 hours if fully discharged. Except in an emergency, full discharge should be avoided as it drastically reduces battery life.
A car battery should withstand up to a dozen full discharges.
A deep cycle leisure battery should withstand 100 deep discharges, or many hundreds of 50% discharges.
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