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Global youth uprising
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Posts: 10166
Location: south east England

PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2019 5:33 pm    Post subject: Global youth uprising Reply with quote

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/26/young-people-predisposed-shake-up-established-order-protest

About 41% of the global population are under 24. And they’re angry…
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ReserveGrowthRulz



Joined: 19 May 2019
Posts: 405
Location: Colorado

PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2019 6:26 pm    Post subject: Re: Global youth uprising Reply with quote

UndercoverElephant wrote:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/26/young-people-predisposed-shake-up-established-order-protest

About 41% of the global population are under 24. And they’re angry…


Just wait until they figure out that saving the biosphere includes them not having cellphones, chairs to warm called "jobs", and OMG what do you mean I have to find, kill, skin, prepare and eat rabbit!!!
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eatyourveg



Joined: 15 Jul 2007
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You may find RGR that what many of them are campaigning for is systemic change, so those old chestnuts that we oldies churn out re mobile phones and what have you really are getting a bit worn out. These comments are called cliches for a reason.
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ReserveGrowthRulz



Joined: 19 May 2019
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Location: Colorado

PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

eatyourveg wrote:
You may find RGR that what many of them are campaigning for is systemic change, so those old chestnuts that we oldies churn out re mobile phones and what have you really are getting a bit worn out. These comments are called cliches for a reason.


And your experience with the 18-24 year old set? I've got 2 kids in college, I get to hang out with them all the time.

I'll stand fast on my characterization of their expected behavior in adverse circumstances. Admittedly, the college set I get to see and interact with isn't representative of the world of yougnlings as a whole.

But please, pray tell, what are your impressions from what I assume are regular interactions with this age group?
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eatyourveg



Joined: 15 Jul 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2019 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well RGR, 3 kids ages between 24-30.
I also run a business which attracts a lot of them (campsite, campground to you), they tend to choose to come here because it's a bit eco and considerably wilder than the usual UK campsite.
My general impression is that they are no better or worse than any other generation, but they do face challenges. Funnily enough I was reading an article earlier which pretty much summed up these challenges. No wonder they can get a bit arsey really. Extract below then link to article.

What has intensified this urgency is the backdrop of looming ecological catastrophe. Even where protests are not explicitly about environmental concerns, the prospect of planetary catastrophe in our lifetimes raises the stakes for all political action. “The kids who are walking out of school have a hugely radical understanding of the way that politics works, and they recognise that our democratic processes and structures as they stand are designed to uphold the status quo,” Jake Woodier, one of the organisers behind the UK climate strike movement, told me this year. “They know that they will be worse off than their parents, know that they’ll never own a home, and know that on current trends they could live to see the end of humanity. So for them, for us, politics is not a game, it’s reality, and that’s reflected in the way we organise – relentlessly, radically, as if our lives depend on it.”

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/oct/29/global-protest-children-financial-crash-hong-kong-london

Anyway, like all sections of the population some are total dipsticks and some aren't.
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ReserveGrowthRulz



Joined: 19 May 2019
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2019 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

eatyourveg wrote:
Well RGR, 3 kids ages between 24-30.
I also run a business which attracts a lot of them (campsite, campground to you), they tend to choose to come here because it's a bit eco and considerably wilder than the usual UK campsite.


So, you get to see the outdoorsy, and European types. I tend to bump more into Texans and urbanites. Mostly American, obviously.

eatyourveg wrote:

My general impression is that they are no better or worse than any other generation, but they do face challenges.


A kind way to put it. At the age of 12 I was trapping fox and raccoons for money, and feeding my family with a rifle. So my expectations might be a little more severe for what a youngling ought to be capable of as well.

I am interested in what you feel their "challenges" are?

eatyourveg wrote:

Funnily enough I was reading an article earlier which pretty much summed up these challenges. No wonder they can get a bit arsey really. Extract below then link to article.

What has intensified this urgency is the backdrop of looming ecological catastrophe. Even where protests are not explicitly about environmental concerns, the prospect of planetary catastrophe in our lifetimes raises the stakes for all political action. “The kids who are walking out of school have a hugely radical understanding of the way that politics works, and they recognise that our democratic processes and structures as they stand are designed to uphold the status quo,” Jake Woodier, one of the organisers behind the UK climate strike movement, told me this year. “They know that they will be worse off than their parents, know that they’ll never own a home, and know that on current trends they could live to see the end of humanity. So for them, for us, politics is not a game, it’s reality, and that’s reflected in the way we organise – relentlessly, radically, as if our lives depend on it.”

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/oct/29/global-protest-children-financial-crash-hong-kong-london
Anyway, like all sections of the population some are total dipsticks and some aren't.


Indeed. And interestingly, I haven't heard a single youngling mention anything about climate change. Not a one. However, as I mentioned before, I'm not bumping into the outdoorsy types. Although I would think that my interaction with the more urban lot would reveal at least some interest in the topic. Politics hasn't come up as a topic much either.

Differences just because of which continent they were raised on?
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Mark



Joined: 13 Dec 2007
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Location: NW England

PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2019 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ReserveGrowthRulz wrote:
At the age of 12 I was trapping fox and raccoons for money, and feeding my family with a rifle. So my expectations might be a little more severe for what a youngling ought to be capable of as well.


I'm constantly amazed that any wildlife at all survives in the US. With the number of huntin/shootin/fishin NRA types going out there with their semi-automatic weapons, blasting everything in sight, and leaving lead-shot carcasses in the countryside to get into the food chain...
Although, granted, there has been a limited return for the buffalo.

As a long-term sustainable food source for 327 million people when the time arrives......, forget it.....
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2019 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a huge difference in population density between the UK and the US, and most of Europe for that matter. Most countries aren't like our country where we are crammed in and what isn't lived in/on is used to provide food. Having said that only 8% of the UK land area is "developed" but whether that 8% includes gardens and rural parks or not I don't know; depends who made the calculation. The US has huge areas of "unused" land where wildlife can roam compared to the UK.

People who want to prove that the UK has plenty of land for migrants tend to put gardens and parks and roads into non developed areas. That means we have plenty of space to build huts in our gardens to put migrants in as they have been doing in the cities recently.
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ReserveGrowthRulz



Joined: 19 May 2019
Posts: 405
Location: Colorado

PostPosted: Tue Oct 29, 2019 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark wrote:
ReserveGrowthRulz wrote:
At the age of 12 I was trapping fox and raccoons for money, and feeding my family with a rifle. So my expectations might be a little more severe for what a youngling ought to be capable of as well.


I'm constantly amazed that any wildlife at all survives in the US. With the number of huntin/shootin/fishin NRA types going out there with their semi-automatic weapons, blasting everything in sight, and leaving lead-shot carcasses in the countryside to get into the food chain...
Although, granted, there has been a limited return for the buffalo.


Your impression is amusing, to say the least. I used a bolt action 22 to put down anything caught in the traps. Lever action 30-30 for whitetail, until I moved up to a slide action '06.

Didn't leave stuff in the field because we et' it.

Mark wrote:

As a long-term sustainable food source for 327 million people when the time arrives......, forget it.....


Been waiting "for the time to come" ever since, you know, time started and doomers began whining.
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Mark



Joined: 13 Dec 2007
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Location: NW England

PostPosted: Wed Oct 30, 2019 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ReserveGrowthRulz wrote:
Your impression is amusing, to say the least. I used a bolt action 22 to put down anything caught in the traps. Lever action 30-30 for whitetail, until I moved up to a slide action '06.

Didn't leave stuff in the field because we et' it.


and your arrogance doesn't surprise me.....

I could quote lots of stuff, but here's just one small example:
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/mar/16/us-bald-eagles-lead-poisoning-ammunition

Appreciate the population density is very different in the US, but there's still no way that the natural environment could support 327 million....
A non-scientific hunch, a few hundred thousand at best, maybe ?
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 30, 2019 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark wrote:
................Appreciate the population density is very different in the US, but there's still no way that the natural environment could support 327 million....
A non-scientific hunch, a few hundred thousand at best, maybe ?


From wikipedia
Quote:
While it is difficult to determine exactly how many Natives lived in North America before Columbus,[6] estimates range from a low of 2.1 million[7] to 7 million[8] people to a high of 18 million

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Mark



Joined: 13 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 30, 2019 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seems reasonable, but the amount of land available isn't the same.
You have to knock off all the land that is now inhabited, farmed, industrialised, polluted etc.
No idea what %age of the US is still wild - between 10% and 30 % ?
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fuzzy



Joined: 29 Nov 2013
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Location: The Marches, UK

PostPosted: Wed Oct 30, 2019 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And the buffalo are gone
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ReserveGrowthRulz



Joined: 19 May 2019
Posts: 405
Location: Colorado

PostPosted: Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark wrote:
ReserveGrowthRulz wrote:
Your impression is amusing, to say the least. I used a bolt action 22 to put down anything caught in the traps. Lever action 30-30 for whitetail, until I moved up to a slide action '06.

Didn't leave stuff in the field because we et' it.


and your arrogance doesn't surprise me.....


Pointing out how us hillbillys took care of our protein needs is hardly arrogant. You got a problem with acquiring protein through the use of traps and a rifle?

Mark wrote:

I could quote lots of stuff, but here's just one small example:
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/mar/16/us-bald-eagles-lead-poisoning-ammunition

Appreciate the population density is very different in the US, but there's still no way that the natural environment could support 327 million....
A non-scientific hunch, a few hundred thousand at best, maybe ?


Never killed a bald eagle, so while I am sure there are problems with them being poisoned, killed or generally mistreated, all of that is illegal, and don't dump off on responsible game hunters the acts of bad folk.

And of course I appreciate the US population density being what it is, our country was founded by folks who wanted nothing to do with rabbit warren conditions of those trapped on some little island.
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ReserveGrowthRulz



Joined: 19 May 2019
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Location: Colorado

PostPosted: Wed Oct 30, 2019 6:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fuzzy wrote:
And the buffalo are gone


Obviously you have never been to North Dakota. I woke up after a night of peaceful ninja camping while hitchhiking across the country on summer break in college within a dozen yards of a herd of the things. Most disconcerting.

The buffalo are gone...talk about continental buffoonery, I had a buffalo burger just this past summer. I'm betting it came from one of those beasts in that herd that scared the bejesus out of me, all those years ago.
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