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What (if anything) do you plan to stockpile for Brexit?
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boisdevie



Joined: 26 Dec 2012
Posts: 269
Location: N Lancashire

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vortex2 wrote:
Seriously, it's getting close .. anyone doing any real stockpiling?

Already stockpiled.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A case of your favorite French or Italian wine might be in order.
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mikepepler
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Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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Location: Rye, UK

PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2019 1:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Vortex2 wrote:
Seriously, it's getting close .. anyone doing any real stockpiling?

I brought forward some purchases of stuff made outside the UK, partly in case currencies shift a lot. Nothing exciting though, stuff like chain oil for the saw...
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2019 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can get away with vegetable oil instead of mineral chain oil. The thing to stockpile is petrol and two stroke oil with a lot of vegetable oil. Thinking about it, could you use vegetable oil for frying and then a final use in the chainsaw.

As there might be a limited amount of petrol for the chainsaw some extra wear on the chain and bar wouldn't be a long term problem. If it were a rechargeable battery chainsaw working off solar panels things might be a little different.
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2019 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
You can get away with vegetable oil instead of mineral chain oil. The thing to stockpile is petrol and two stroke oil with a lot of vegetable oil. Thinking about it, could you use vegetable oil for frying and then a final use in the chainsaw.


Thanks for that. The tiny amount we have (we rarely deep fry) usually goes in the humanure; that’s a good suggestion.

kenneal - lagger wrote:
As there might be a limited amount of petrol for the chainsaw some extra wear on the chain and bar wouldn't be a long term problem. If it were a rechargeable battery chainsaw working off solar panels things might be a little different.


I have both and the rechargeable is preferable by far. Yes, it uses lithium so neither is ideal but at least our power supplier is 100% wind.
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boisdevie



Joined: 26 Dec 2012
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Location: N Lancashire

PostPosted: Sat Mar 23, 2019 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just ordered 100 pairs of socks. Yes, folks, I'm sockpiling
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2019 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As to the bar oil question you can use any well filtered oil that wont plug up the pump on the saw including used crank case oil or used fry oil but you might have to adjust the pump to pump more of the inferior oil then what the saw is set to deliver. Considering the cost of the saw and how well they run on the intended product and fuel mix I would not make any substitution until I was forced to do so. If your going to stockpile something stockpile five years worth of the real McCoy.
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mikepepler
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Joined: 24 Nov 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
You can get away with vegetable oil instead of mineral chain oil. The thing to stockpile is petrol and two stroke oil with a lot of vegetable oil. Thinking about it, could you use vegetable oil for frying and then a final use in the chainsaw.

As there might be a limited amount of petrol for the chainsaw some extra wear on the chain and bar wouldn't be a long term problem. If it were a rechargeable battery chainsaw working off solar panels things might be a little different.

I already use bio chain oil, so technically veg oil anyway, though with stuff added to thicken it and stop it going off (the cheap stuff turns to glue if you leave the saw standing for a few weeks). But I agree, in a pinch normal veg oil would do.

I switched to a battery saw about a year ago, which I can charge from the solar panels at home. Since buying it, I've only fired up the petrol saw occasionally, such that I switched from petrol to Aspen fuel so it didn't go off. I used the battery saw for all my coppicing this year - it's slower, but no exhaust fumes to breath in, no starter cord to pull and less noise. Video of it in action here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbvAiFcvkBI

and a video of the amount of wood I cut with it this winter here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92WoaihDMsg
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If your using an electric saw you will find it doubly important to keep it razor sharp. Avoid cutting any wood that has been dragged through the dirt and certainly never let it touch the ground at the end of a cut. I've found a" Dremel "rotary tool makes sharpening quick and easy and you can get stones to fit any pitch (size ) chain.
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://youtu.be/SzjmpNTVH6U

I’ve used several sharpeners and the above is by far the easiest and most foolproof.

There’s a cheaper version - made in the same factory in Germany with the same files - in a green casing; can’t find its name right now.
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vtsnowedin



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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The guy in the video doesn't seem to know what he is doing.
The gadget is filing the clearer at the same time as the tooth which needs to be done but not every time and not as much as some badly dulled teeth need it.
Of course being American I don't do things by hand if a power tool is handy so I have put my hand files and file-n-guide ( an older version of the product in the video)away unless I'm way out in the woods. Also I've been doing this for fifty years so have finally developed the skills to do it well.
Many of the chains they sell to home owners today have clearers that come way too high to make kickback less likely but also make fast cutting impossible. These chains benefit from having the clearers (rakers) filed down to -0.65mm before the first cut. A gauge to check the height can be had for about $1.50.
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emordnilap



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Location: Houǝsʇlʎ' ᴉʇ,s ɹǝɐllʎ uoʇ ʍoɹʇɥ ʇɥǝ ǝɟɟoɹʇ' pou,ʇ ǝʌǝu qoʇɥǝɹ˙

PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2019 11:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I never watched the vid. - it was just to point out the tool, which is damn near perfect.

Between three and six strokes is all it takes to keep the tooth and the (rake? guide?) in good condition and aligned.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

emordnilap wrote:
I never watched the vid. - it was just to point out the tool, which is damn near perfect.

Between three and six strokes is all it takes to keep the tooth and the (rake? guide?) in good condition and aligned.
Oh I'm sure you can do a good job with it if you hold it properly.
The guy in the vid seemed clueless that the handles were slanted on the proper angle to use and were the visual guide that was much easier to use then the scribe mark on the top back of each tooth. I didn't watch the whole thing as the start was too stupid to continue so maybe he figures it out mid video.
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The angle on that chain in the video looked to be about 10 deg which is the angle on my ripping chains that I use for cutting boards with my saw mill. The cross cut chains which I use for felling and logging are from 25 to 30 degrees.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Tue Mar 26, 2019 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kenneal - lagger wrote:
The angle on that chain in the video looked to be about 10 deg which is the angle on my ripping chains that I use for cutting boards with my saw mill. The cross cut chains which I use for felling and logging are from 25 to 30 degrees.

I see you are correct on that. Notice the double links between teeth instead of the usual one. But then he shows using it for some cross cuts which is not recommended for that type of chain.
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