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Optimum room temps?

 
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Vortex2



Joined: 13 Jan 2019
Posts: 183

PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 4:44 pm    Post subject: Optimum room temps? Reply with quote

Our new MVHR has ben calculated to be able to heat our house up to around 21C ... but it is pushed to reach 19C.

If we turn on a 800 watt radiant heater the house heats up to 21C within an hour or two.

However in reality we find 19C to be fine during the days and 16C or less at night.

Are these reasonable/safe working temps?
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adam2
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Joined: 02 Jul 2007
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Location: North Somerset

PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A bit low for the elderly, or the disabled, or very young children, but should be fine for adults in normal health.
And dressed for the season of course.

Might be a bit chilly for prolonged inactivity such a reading or being online.
With good insulation, the energy cost of extra heating should be modest.

All electric heating is virtually 100% efficient, but directional infrared heating has the merit of warming persons at which it is directed, even when the power used is insufficient to much raise the air temperature.
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
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Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The comfort level at any one temperature is a function of the temperature of the adjacent surfaces, the amount of air movement, the presence or not of a radiant heat source, the amount of clothing worn and the physiology of the person judging the comfort level. So from that you can see that it is not an easy subject to get right in all circumstances.

We live at temperatures varying from 16 to about 21 deg C. 16 is comfortable if we are active in the kitchen for instance but woulf feel a little chilly if sitting waiting for the wood fire to warm up: it would elicit a cold nose from me even wearing my usual winter three layers. I will often wear three layers indoors and the same outside butr then take a layer off if chopping wood or engaging in any other strenuous activity.

17 to 19 would be our usual sitting around temperatures but if we have visitors the house in warmed to 21 and I will wear one layer only and still feel over warm.
Our house has high thermal mass although the insulation level is not what it could be so we do not usually have low inside surface temperatures. We do not have high air movement and the heating system is engineered to avoid a high temperature difference between upstairs and downstairs which will cause fast air movement. We also keep doors closed to reduce air movement between warm and cool areas. We are in our late 60s but have been used to lower temperatures throughout most of our married life.

Morning temperature in the house would be about 16 degrees but we have no problem with that. I probably have a hotter shower than many people to counter the cool bathroom air temperature but that is only supposition. I find it more comfortable to get out of a hot shower into a cool room than into a hot one.

Hope that helps.
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Vortex2



Joined: 13 Jan 2019
Posts: 183

PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds similar to us. Not fans of 20+C.

We have been advisd multiple times to have a heated bathroom towel rail, to give a warmer feel to the bathroom ... it's a good idea!

Our MVHR gives water out at about 50-52C which seems too warm to me so I'll turn it down when I find the right submenu!
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adam2
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At present my room temperatures are

Living room------------23
my bedroom-----------19
Bathroom---------------11
Spare room-------------9

The living room is heated by a wood stove.
Unused rooms are heated by 500 watt electric heaters during off peak hours only
The bathroom is heated when needed by a Tilley infra-red radiator, and in severe weather a hurricane lamp is left burning continually to prevent freezing of the plumbing.

My bedroom which also serves as a workshop/junk store/office/cat den is not normally heated, but in very cold weather I use the Tilley radiator from the bathroom.
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Vortex2



Joined: 13 Jan 2019
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow - you like it hot!
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 5223
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I heat my house with a single gravity type wood furnace in the basement. The hot air rises up the open stair cases and one central floor vent and cold air returns down grates in the room corners. The cats move around from sunny windows to bed corners or find the stair step that is just the right temp to suit them. Today I have a fan circulating the air around the main floor to keep the living room uniform for the football game , about 20C.
Days like today, -5 this morning +13F mid day, consume quite a bit of wood but I have plenty to work with.
I would keep it a lot colder and dress for it but the Misses likes it warm enough to lounge around in pajamas and robe so am still in my slippers past noon. Smile
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Potemkin Villager



Joined: 14 Mar 2006
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Location: Narnia

PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

vtsnowedin wrote:


.... I would keep it a lot colder and dress for it but the Misses likes it warm enough to lounge around in pajamas and robe so am still in my slippers past noon. Smile


Can anybody explain to me why the fair sex prefer it so much warmer, despite their superior internal insulation, than mere men? I am seriously addicted to radiant heat from whatever source. It really makes the old bones feel good.
Most houses, offices, shops etc I visit seem insanely overheated to me.
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adam2
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 10:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many members of the fairer sex are reluctant to wear warm clothes, lest these be considered non-flattering.

Many women's clothes are made of lighter/less warm materials than men's garments. I recall a member commenting on cold weather hats with ear flaps, the women's version had the flaps sewn in the "up" position such that these could not cover the ears but were simply decorative. USELESS FASHION.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well we raised three daughters and through their teen age years saw quite a bit of clothing chosen more for fashion then practicality. Still get the occasional Victoria's Secret catalog from time to time. Confused
MY daughters were quite practical when they were doing outside activities like skiing or riding snow machines, but liked evening wear to be the silks and satin that feel nice on the skin. Many a warm bath robe and fuzzy slippers to go over them of course, and me keeping the house well heated, much appreciated. I do miss having the young crew to help put up the wood pile but have cut the load with a grapple for the tractor and a hydrolic wood splitter.
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emordnilap



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Potemkin Villager wrote:
vtsnowedin wrote:


.... I would keep it a lot colder and dress for it but the Misses likes it warm enough to lounge around in pajamas and robe so am still in my slippers past noon. Smile


Can anybody explain to me why the fair sex prefer it so much warmer, despite their superior internal insulation, than mere men?


You haven’t been around enough. 😁 My OH is obviously far hardier than your snowflake female compatriots. If mine were a typical example, then the idea that women are tougher than men would be indisputable.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Women can be as tough as they need to be but unlike men don't feel any need to prove it daily through self deprivation.
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
Posts: 12654
Location: York

PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

adam2 wrote:
Many members of the fairer sex are reluctant to wear warm clothes, lest these be considered non-flattering.

Many women's clothes are made of lighter/less warm materials than men's garments. I recall a member commenting on cold weather hats with ear flaps, the women's version had the flaps sewn in the "up" position such that these could not cover the ears but were simply decorative. USELESS FASHION.

'Twas I.

In other news, the only 2 winter coats I've worn in the past decade were
1. Canadian, women's
2. British (after hunting high & low for a coat that'd actually work), men's.

Meanwhile, indoors I'm happy with 17 degC, 15 at night. Everyone says this is barking, for <3-related reasons, but I wear a fair-isle & if I feel cold I go & do something (e.g. drink tea, saw up wood) to warm up. I find 21 too stuffy. I might feel differently if I'd broken a leg or lived to 90.

Several years ago I recall realising with a shock that I'm our only family member ever to have experienced a power cut...
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adam2
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 3:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

15 degrees is fine IME at night and when sleeping.
My bedroom temperature varies from about 20 degrees in the mildest of winter weather down to about 10 degrees in colder weather.

It can get too hot in Summer.

over 25 degrees---------------electric fan required.
About 20 degrees-------------one blanket on bed
about 15 degrees-------------two blankets
about 10 degrees-------------three blankets

If it goes below 5 degrees then I would use an electric heater.

I aim to keep the main living room at about 22 degrees, but it varies a good deal.
In mild winter weather the wood stove can overheat the room
In very severe weather it can struggle to reach 22 degrees, but normally it is fine.
I sometimes use a 2Kw fan heater on a time switch for the last hour of off peak electricity in the living room.
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kenneal - lagger
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Temperatures in our unheated bedrooms vary from about 12 at night during the coldest winter days to 23 max in the summer during a heat wave; the joys of cob and heavy thermal mass.
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