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Conservative government watch
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johnhemming2



Joined: 30 Jun 2015
Posts: 1902

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Corbyn is a traditional International Socialist. That fits in really with Podemos and Syriza, but I would say he is to the left of their positions (particularly that of Syriza before they were elected).

He is to the left of Michael Foot.
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Lord Beria3



Joined: 25 Feb 2009
Posts: 4064
Location: Moscow Russia

PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 11:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Corbyn is a throwback to the 1970's which is part of his appeal (he rejects neo-liberalism) and part of the problem.

Even if we wanted to, a reversion to 1970's social democracy is not feasible on the economic and energy base we operate under.

Nearly 50% of students go to university so abolishing tuition fees would cost around £100 billion. We should go back a generation when only 10% of students went to university and the rest did technical courses or went straight to work at 16/18.

I don't see any evidence that Corbyn understands the limits to growth issue or the need, in a post-growth economic world looming, to shrink the size of our bloated public sector state and welfare economy.

Without growth, our bureaucratic welfare systems are affordable and unsustainable as Greer has written about in his many books over the years. Instead of promising deficit blowing further pay rises to the army of public sector workers, we need a radical reform and devolution of public sector provision to the local level.

Similarly, Corbyn's support of letting refugees may be noble but will be national suicide in the era of mass migrations from north Africa and the Middle East (currently mainly economic migrants but climate refugees soon). Controlling our borders and keeping the migrants out is key.

I could go on.

Whilst some of his policies, including clamping down on corporate tax evasion, cutting Trident, developing an industrial strategy, "People's QE" and tax rises for the ultra-rich may make some sense and could work, if they are designed to prop up a unsustainable status quo they will be doomed to failure.

I suppose some of you will say that is better then the alternative but to me the support for Corbyn is driven by a desire to return to a pre-Great Recession era of perpetual growth and ever higher public sector spending binge.

That era is dead because growth is dying around the world.

The future is all about contraction not expansion.
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johnhemming2



Joined: 30 Jun 2015
Posts: 1902

PostPosted: Thu Jul 13, 2017 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lord Beria3 wrote:
Nearly 50% of students go to university so abolishing tuition fees would cost around £100 billion.

At the moment the government pays on the last estimate 43% of the fees. To increase that to 100% would cost something like 11bn a year. There is, of course, the question as to what graduates do about the future graduate contributions they are committed to. There is also a question as to what is done about student support for living whilst studying.

Labour's strategy in the general election was to accept most of the planned cuts to benefits and focus on the middle classes.

I think there are real issues about freezing means tested benefits when we have inflation growing when it comes to day to day issues like food.

The figure of 100bn relates to scrapping the future contributions (aka debt)
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Posts: 8524
Location: south east England

PostPosted: Sat Jul 22, 2017 1:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Theresa May as Miss Havisham.

I was browsing the comments sections on Conservative Home, and in a discussion about whether or not Theresa May needs to be replaced as Tory leader somebody posted this:

Quote:

A new leader might be in no stronger a position but they would be a stronger leader.

As you correctly point out Mrs Mays successor will have a wafer thin majority, is at the mercy of different factions and may be unable to pass all but the blandest of legislation. They cannot (and should not) call a general election, but Mrs May will never lead another GE campaign yet she is notionally in charge of preparations.

The problems you enumerate apply just as much to the incumbent as to her replacement but retaining Mrs May exacerbates these problems by trapping us forever at ten o'clock on the night of June 7th when everything fell apart for her.


This sums it up perfectly. May is like Miss Havisham from Great Expectations. Gilted at the altar by the electorate, now living in a ruined mansion, looking like a cross between a skeleton and a ghost. The tory party is trapped at the moment the exit poll came out. They have enough power to remain trapped rather than in opposition, at least for the moment, but not enough power to escape the trap.

http://www.conservativehome.com/thetorydiary/2017/07/andrew-gimsons-pmqs-sketch-may-cannot-dispel-a-sense-of-precariousness.html
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RenewableCandy



Joined: 12 Sep 2007
Posts: 12422
Location: York

PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Without growth, our bureaucratic welfare systems are affordable and unsustainable as Greer has written about in his many books over the years. Instead of promising deficit blowing further pay rises to the army of public sector workers, we need a radical reform and devolution of public sector provision to the local level.


I can't see that making things any more efficient.

The NHS, for example, is excellent vfm compared with other countries' healthcare systems and partly, at least, because it benefits from economies of scale.
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