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Advice on dealing with established bramble
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
Posts: 13518
Location: way out west

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Going by that website, finance should't be a problem. There again, people with money often have plenty because they're parsimonious.
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
Posts: 8330
Location: south east England

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

emordnilap wrote:
Going by that website, finance should't be a problem. There again, people with money often have plenty because they're parsimonious.


When it was built, Tillington Terrace was the height of late Victorian luxury. And whilst most Victorian houses of that size have since been turned into flats, this entire terrace is still all houses.

I think it is not so much the money that is the problem, but trying to get 16 different people to agree on what their shared front garden should be like.

Picture 8 of 10 shows the "bed" I am talking about. Imagine monster brambles growing 15ft high through those shrubs and trees and you'll get the idea.
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woodburner



Joined: 06 Apr 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The shared garden should be approximately as you (UE) decide it should be. The owners should allow you a free hand. I don't see a problem as long as you don't go for trendy hard landscaping (or any other things I don't approve of).
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UndercoverElephant



Joined: 10 Mar 2008
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Location: south east England

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodburner wrote:
The shared garden should be approximately as you (UE) decide it should be. The owners should allow you a free hand.


I have tried to convince them of this, via the one person who usually communicates with me. I certainly agree that it would be the best option, not just practically but probably aesthetically too. Unfortunately it is not likely to happen. They want me to make some spaces and plant some things to make it more colourful. I could very easily do this on just that instruction, but in fact I have had to send them a list of colourful shrubs that will grow in partial shade on acid soil, and how much they are likely to cost, and I am now waiting for the committee to decide which ones they want, and what colours, etc... I have been told not to expect an answer quickly. Rolling Eyes
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 2:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about explaining that it isn't an instant transformation into their dreams, but a step by step with plenty of opportunities to modify it as it develops? Gardens are realy a 20+ year exercise not a 2 week installation. Personally I would have primroses, wood anemonies, violets, hazel for a reminder of woodlands, then foxgloves ox eye dasies, geraniums of several sorts, (not pelargoniums) and a few others.with a few bird boxes and feeders around (and some Fenn Mk 6 traps for squirrels Twisted Evil) When it comes to autumn, a swipe with a scythe will allow easy maintenance. Then, after the first year, you can discuss the changes possible, and just do one smallish change, then something else the next year.
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Last edited by woodburner on Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:00 am; edited 1 time in total
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kenneal - lagger
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Joined: 20 Sep 2006
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Location: Newbury, Berkshire

PostPosted: Thu Feb 16, 2017 5:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodburner wrote:
What about explaining that it isn't an instant transformation into their dreams, ....


People expect instant gratification these days. If Alan Titchmarsh can do a whole garden in five days ....
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emordnilap



Joined: 05 Sep 2007
Posts: 13518
Location: way out west

PostPosted: Fri Feb 17, 2017 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brambles aren't a problem; committees are. Laughing
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 4072
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 1:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm plotting/researching/planning what I am going to do for soil enrichment and game food plots this season. I came across this rancher from North Dakota that is using multi species cover crops and mob grazing cattle over some of the acreage to produce both crops and finished beef,pork and chicken using no chemicals or commercial fertilizers. He claims a cost to produce corn of $1.65 per bushel while it is selling from $4.00 to $5.50.
I don't know as I swallow all his stuff hook line and sinker but I might try some of his ideas on a few acres this summer. Anybody here familiar with him and have an opinion?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuwwfL2o9d4
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 3:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back to removing brambles. This is how I would go about it. Smile
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_M5bjpLuExI
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woodburner



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PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good example of habitat destruction IMO.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
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Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 3:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

woodburner wrote:
Good example of habitat destruction IMO.

You can certainly view it that way.
It certainly gets rid of what was growing in that space. The question becomes what will it be replaced with and the value of that crop. the tractor and attachment accomplishes what the operator or property owner wanted to do but the result might vary from a bit more lawn to a herb garden supplying the household or a bit of vineyard.
I'm not saying any of those options are good or bad only that if that is what you want done, that tractor attachment combination is a very efficient way to start your project .
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fuzzy



Joined: 29 Nov 2013
Posts: 449
Location: The Marches, UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

vtsnowedin wrote:
I'm plotting/researching/planning what I am going to do for soil enrichment and game food plots this season. I came across this rancher from North Dakota that is using multi species cover crops and mob grazing cattle over some of the acreage to produce both crops and finished beef,pork and chicken using no chemicals or commercial fertilizers. He claims a cost to produce corn of $1.65 per bushel while it is selling from $4.00 to $5.50.
I don't know as I swallow all his stuff hook line and sinker but I might try some of his ideas on a few acres this summer. Anybody here familiar with him and have an opinion?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuwwfL2o9d4


I will watch video when I have sound, but I can recommend green mustard seed on a small scale garden, as a natural fertiliser and pest control. You can smell it at cress size. If you leave the crop you get big woody stems like oilseed, but they pull up easily and don't regrow. It's a nitro fixer, so free plant food.
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vtsnowedin



Joined: 07 Jan 2011
Posts: 4072
Location: New England ,Chelsea Vermont

PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2017 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fuzzy wrote:
vtsnowedin wrote:
I'm plotting/researching/planning what I am going to do for soil enrichment and game food plots this season. I came across this rancher from North Dakota that is using multi species cover crops and mob grazing cattle over some of the acreage to produce both crops and finished beef,pork and chicken using no chemicals or commercial fertilizers. He claims a cost to produce corn of $1.65 per bushel while it is selling from $4.00 to $5.50.
I don't know as I swallow all his stuff hook line and sinker but I might try some of his ideas on a few acres this summer. Anybody here familiar with him and have an opinion?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuwwfL2o9d4


I will watch video when I have sound, but I can recommend green mustard seed on a small scale garden, as a natural fertiliser and pest control. You can smell it at cress size. If you leave the crop you get big woody stems like oilseed, but they pull up easily and don't regrow. It's a nitro fixer, so free plant food.
I have seen mustard mentioned several times and will probably add it to a mix. I'm thinking of starting with an acre of cereal rye that I will roll down and then plant soybeans and crimson clover plus radishes into to have something green for the deer after the beans are frost killed. Each additional acre needs to be plowed and rock picked and some have a lot of brush to clear and deroot before that. I want it all to be smooth enough for mowing so I can knock things down or sell a hay crop off if that is in the rotation. I'm looking for a notill planter to add to the equipment lineup.
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